Heritage

The stories behind Pennington’s place names, grand houses, and buildings.

Index

Places and place names

Older buildings

The Pound

Fox Pond

Deneside

Haglane

Oxey

Gordleton

Woodside (Rookes)

Ridgeway

Widbury

Newlease

The Commons

Pennington Cross

Pennington Chase

Old Infant School

Old Junior School

Post Office & General Store

Parish Pump

Soup Kitchen

Vine Terrace/Stotes Yard

Fox Pond Cottage

Long Thatch

Lamb and Lion

White Hart

Wheel Inn

Chequers Inn

WI Hall

St Marks Church

War Memorial

Grand Estates

Manorfields

Manor Farm House

Priestlands

Pennington House

Wainsford Estate

Ramley House

Yaldhurst

Pennington

(add name history, ie. Penny Tun – an enclosure for which a penny’s rent would be paid)

The Pound

In the 1790 valuation survey of Pennington Narvett, listed at a nominal value is “The Pound”.

the-pound

The area now occupied by Pound Road is shown as allotments in the tithe maps from 1842 but we understand on this land there had once stood Pennington’s pound. This was a small enclosed area where stray livestock would be kept until reclaimed by their owners (for a fee).

The Sussex County Magazine in 1930 stated:

“Nearly every village once had its pound for stray cattle, pigs, geese, etc. to be driven into and there kept at the expense of the owner, till such time as he should pay the fine (the amount claimed by the person on whose land they had strayed, for damage done), and the fee to the pound keeper, man or sometimes woman, for feeding and watering the same.

If not claimed in three weeks, the animals were driven to the nearest market and sold, the proceeds going to the impounder and pound-keeper. An ingenious form of receipt was sometimes used. The person who found the animals on his land cut a stick and made notches, one for every beast, and then split the stick down the centre of the notches so that half each notch appeared on each stick; one half he kept, the other he gave to the pound-keeper.

When the owner came to redeem his property and had paid for the damage done, the impounder gave him his half stick. He took this to the pound-keeper, and if the two pieces tallied, it proved he had paid and his beast was freed. Hence the word tally-stick and the pound-keeper being referred to as the tallyman”.


Fox Pond

Fox Pond Cottage, previously an Inn called The Fox

At one time, Stephens tells us, Fox Pond Cottage¬†(a listed building) was once an Inn called ‚ÄúThe Fox‚ÄĚ.

foxpondcottage

(Perhaps this Inn gave name to the pond that existed at the time, on which the Fox Pond shops now stand  РTBC based on tithe records if possible..)


Deneside and Haglane

Both areas, until relatively recently (insert date) , were woodland known as Deneside Copse and Haglane Copse.

(Origins of “Haglane” and “Deneside”?)


Oxey

(Ox being the old English name for cattle.)


Gordleton


Rookes

(Named after the owners of Rokkes Gardens – now known as Woodside)


Ridgeway

(Presume named given the existence of the geographical ridge at the edge of the river terrace)


The Bunny Run

‘Bunnies’ were¬†ravines between two towns. This makes sense given that Yaldhurst stream, which is the boundary between Pennington and Lymington, runs through the bottom of the valley across which the Bunny Run goes.

Oftentimes in nearby Milford such bunnies were used to bring contraband up from the sea: Milford Bunny, Becton Bunny and Chewton Bunny were all used. Its not known (yet) if this was the case in Pennington Рmost likely the best route for a smuggler was west of the village instead.


Widbury


Newlease


The Commons


Pennington  Cross


Pennington Chase


Yaldhurst

(Comes from Domesday Book – to add actual reference)


Grand Estates and Houses

Manorfields

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Manorfields was built by a former Govenor of Bermuda upon his return to Britain in 1928. It is a fine example of the Arts and Crafts architecture movement. Manorfields is securely tucked away up a long sweeping driveway, which joins Lower Pennington Lane towards in southern end.

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Manor Farm House

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(To be added)

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Priestlands House

Priestlands House was built in early Victorian times but following WW2 was purchased by Hampshire County Council to become the Gurney-Dixon Centre, used for adult education and similar, but after recent rebuilding has become part of the school complex.

Joan Stephens writes, in Pennington Remembered, that in 1859 the house was owned by Mrs Thornton, in 1891 a Captain F Ellis, and in the 1920’s a Major Tillyer Blunt. When Mrs Blunt died Hampshire County Council acquired the property. After WW2, the increasing population in Pennington caused a local shortage in school space so Priestlands House was converted into an infant school, replacing the older smaller infant school in the village until the new infant school was built on top of Priestlands Farm in 1967.

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Ramley House

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Ramley House seems to have been built in 1805, the year in which Lord Nelson succeeded at the Battle of Trafalgar.¬† Ramley was reputed to have been built for a prosperous Jamaican sugar merchant, however the first name to appear in the land tax returns is that of a widow, Charlotte Rose.¬† Charlotte died in 1816, and the land tax returns for 1817 have an entry for Ramley House which reads: ‚ÄėMr Hunt for his house and land, late Mrs Rose‚Äô. (Credit: ramleyhouse.com).

Later Ramley has been a nursing home, and is now a family home as well as the location of a local vineyeard!

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Pennington House

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Pennington House is a Georgian house with later added wings. It is not know when Pennington House was built; originally it was probably a farmhouse with some connection to the local salt industry, the earliest know records date to an auction taking place in 1764. The house has had many owners and tennents, one record shows that it was bought by Colonel John Sheddon (he lived at Elmers Court) for his daughter Adelaide (d 1891) who married Major General Pringle Taylor (d 1884). It was also tenanted to the 4th Marques of Headfort who in 1901 horrified his family by marrying a well-known singer, dancer and Gaiety Girl, Rosie Boote.

The gardens are open to the public each year under the National Gardens Scheme. The seven acre garden created in around 1905, features an Italian sunken garden, a large walled Victorian kitchen and a splendid wisteria on rear of the house.


Wainsford House

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Yaldhurst

 (Photo pending)

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Yaldhurst is a villa style house with a few acres of land situated to the north of the Lymington to Sway Road at Upper Pennington. The top storey commands views of the Isle of Wight. Land to the south of the house is now a local recreation ground. Cowley Farm borders the west side.

The first record of Yaldhurst dates from the Domesday, when it was included in the Highcliff, Beckley and Hinton Hundred.  The name may be all that remains of a lost village, although there are doubts as to the latter’s exact location.
It is not known when the house was built, but parts of the farmhouse date back 300/400 years. Considerable renovations to the farmhouse were made in the 18th/19th centuries; and the Forbes carried out major building works in the early 20th century, when possibly two storeys were added.  At that time it was an estate of 48.5 ha (120 acres).
According to Hampshire Treasures, the house has painted brick walls with timber eaves, slate below the present eaves, slate roof, and six irregularly spaced and sized windows.  A later extension had a Gothic window, also porch, lantern and dormers.  The interior, remodelled in 18th/19th centuries, had a staircase with iron balusters and ramped handrail.  There was an ornate plaster fireplace.
In 1924 the pleasure gardens and grounds were well timbered and included two tennis lawns, rock garden, rose pergola, herbaceous borders, orchard and kitchen garden, the whole totalling 1.6 ha (4 acres).  The tennis courts no longer exist and are now part of the extension to the recreation ground.  There is still  (1996) an  open area in the front of the house with clumps of rhododendron and other shrubs.  Some fine trees border the drive from Yaldhurst Lane, which at one time may have been part of the main driveway to the house.  An enclosed garden is on the north side of the house and includes a pond.
In the early 19th century, Sir George Pretyman Tombie, who was a Bishop of Winchester, owned the land, which was included in his purchase of the Buckland Estate in 1802.¬† Little is known until the Forbes residency early this century.¬† Admiral Sir Hubert Brand had a short occupancy in the 1920s, when he spent a considerable sum on the garden.¬† The Smith family acquired the house from the Admiral.¬† One of the brothers, G O Smith, was a famous cricketer, who retired to Yaldhurst in 1932.¬† In 1945 a Dr and Mrs Hamish Allan purchased the house as a holiday home and 6.5 ha (16 acres), which they retained for 21 years.¬† Each of the last two owners sold some of the land, and it was the Smith‚Äôs that sold the land to the south of the house to the local council.¬† Rosemund Douglas and Janet Foster became residents in 1966 from which they started their business ‚ÄėForest Crafts‚Äô.¬† In the storm of 1987 11 large lime trees fell and a large oak in the drive.¬† It was shortly after this that the ladies sold the house.

It now appears to be a private residence.

Credit: research.hgt.org.uk/item/yaldhurst/

Older buildings

Old infant school

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Old junior school

Opened in September 1852, the building is of Victorian high architectural art, and is often mistaken for an ex-church. A school house adjoins the school building, which was provided to schoolmasters as a home over the years.


The Church Centre (and what was there before)


Tesco/Sportsmans building


Pennington Post Office and General Store (now Barry Framptons), above which there used to be The Victoria Room in which social functions were held.


The Parish Pump


The Soup Kitchen


Vine Terrace/Stotes Yard


Long Thatch, previously a row of cottages


Magdalen Chapel

The Magdalen Chapel (or the chapel of Pennington Narvett) existed from at least 1276 (evidence?). It was endowed with 60 acres of Priestlands, and that name survives today. The chapel was used up to at least 1558 (evidence). Its not known currently where within the Pennington Narvett manor the chapel stood.

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